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Maine Adult Education Association

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News & Events

Cities Pave the Way: Promising Reentry Policies that Promote Local Hiring of People with Criminal Records [Maine Adult Correctional Education Association]

NLC_Reentry_Strategy_Guide.pdf  This document was supplied by Ellis King.

 

Posted by Richard Lumb  on July 19, 2011

CNA & Driver Education [Merrymeeting Adult Education]

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT:

Please call 729-7323 ext. 1 for the upcoming date of our next Certified Nursing Assistant class.

Merrymeeting Adult Education's CNA program has an application and interview process to determine acceptance in the CNA course. When your application is received by our office you will be contacted to schedule an interview with the CNA Instructor. Classes are held at our Brunswick Region 10 Technical High School location - 68 Church Road, Brunswick. We look forward to hearing from you!

Cost: $975 residents or $995 non-residents.

To download the CNA application click here.

Mail the completed application to: 

Merrymeeting Adult Education, 35 Republic Ave, Topsham, ME  04086

Videos demonstrating essential skills for the CNA: www.cnaclasses.org/videos/

 

DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM:

Merrymeeting Adult Education offers Driver Education courses to help build strong, safe and confident drivers. Students are awarded an instructional permit upon successful completion of the course with a grade of 80% or better.

Classes are held at Mt. Ararat and Brunswick High Schools each fall and winter/spring semesters and once in the summer at Brunswick High School.

Download the current driver education packet HERE. The driver education application packet and payment must be returned to our office prior to the first day of class. Call 729-7323 if you would like an application mailed to you.

Cost: $460  residents, $485 non-residents

 

Posted by Michael Myers  on July 13, 2011 | Read more in: Events and News

Brief History of LVGS [Literacy Volunteers of Greater Sanford]

A Brief History of Literacy Volunteers of Greater Sanford

May 2011 

Founded in 1986, Literacy Volunteers of Greater Sanford (LVGS) is celebrating 25 years of serving the community.  Our mission is supporting the literacy needs of adults age 18 and above with free, confidential one-on-one tutoring and small group instruction by trained adult volunteers.  Our approach is student-centered and we are honored to provide adult learning opportunities. 

LVGS was created following a national media campaign called PLUS—Project Literacy U.S.—that spread the word about how many adults in this country have literacy levels so low that they are prevented from functioning in society and achieving their potential.   

The Sanford PLUS Task Force was formed and included adult educators, business leaders, social service agencies, religious leaders, civic organizations, and media representatives, all working together to find solutions to increasing the literacy rates in our community.  This spirit of collaboration and concern for helping individuals improve their skills and become more self-reliant still motivate our work today. 

Over the years, many volunteers and staff have led and guided LVGS, from its early days as the Goodall Library Literacy Volunteers of America, to its more recent form as an independent, private, 501c3 nonprofit.  We are grateful for the countless hours of service that our volunteer tutors, Board members, office volunteers, and other dedicated individuals have devoted to this cause. 

Community support from businesses, individuals, service clubs, foundations, and other partners has played a fundamental role in our ability to carry out our mission.  Without this support, in the form of donated goods, services, funds, time, publicity, and friendship, we would not have come to our 25th anniversary. 

As we look to the future, we remain passionately dedicated to providing opportunities for students to improve their literacy skills so they can achieve their life goals relating to career, family, education, and civic participation.  We know that one person’s progress with literacy has a positive ripple effect on many other people, and we are honored to have a part in this inspirational story of human learning, dignity, courage and achievement.  

883 Main Street, Suite 4

Sanford, Maine 04073

(207) 324-2486

 

Posted by Ingrid Baily  on July 7, 2011

Accepting CNA Applications [Biddeford Adult Education]

Biddeford Adult Education is accepting applications for our next CNA courses.  Click HERE to get your application. Call  Sue at 282-3883 for more information.

 

Posted by Anne Beaulieu  on July 1, 2011 | Read more in: News

RSU 13 adult education receives grant from Barbara Bush Foundation [RSU #13 Adult and Community Education]

As published in The Herald Gazette: http://knox.villagesoup.com/place/story/rsu-13-adult-education-receives-grant-from-barbara-bush-foundation/413269

 

 

Biddeford — Former first lady Barbara Bush announced recently that the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy’s Maine Family Literacy Initiative has awarded $25,000 to Regional School Unit 13 Adult and Community Education.

Beth A. Gifford, executive director of Literacy Volunteers of Mid-Coast Maine accepted the award from Bush at a ceremony held at the J. Richard Martin Community Center in Biddeford on June 15. The grant will be used to implement the Know and Grow program. This program is a partnership between RSU 13 Adult & Community Education and Literacy Volunteers of Mid-Coast Maine that seeks to expand a thriving adult literacy program to include intergenerational learning in the areas of health, technology and literacy. The project will focus on parental literacy as well as key developmental stages of early childhood. Know and Grow will combine home- and community-based activities to assist adults in earning a credential while helping transition youth to school and beyond.

“The abilities to read, write and comprehend enable people to create brighter and more prosperous futures for themselves, their families and their communities,” said Bush in a news release. “The staff and volunteers with the MEFLI programs are making a wonderful difference in many lives, and I am proud of their work to make Maine a more literate state.”

A total of 10 grants of $25,000 were awarded this year from applications submitted by libraries, adult education and public schools across the state. Programs receiving support provide family literacy services including adult and early childhood instruction, and time for parents and children to read together. An additional two planning grants of $5,000 each will help communities develop the partnerships and resources needed to implement a family literacy program in 2011.

Five “Lighthouse Model Programs” grants of $25,000 have also been awarded to well-established, model family literacy programs that have proposed outreach activities to support the promotion and expansion of family literacy services in Maine. Applicants were selected based on their ability to demonstrate experience and success in providing family literacy programming, the creativity of their outreach activities, and the diversity of their partnerships and target audiences.

Since 1996, The Maine Family Literacy Initiative has awarded 243 grants totaling $4,341,991. To learn more, visit mainefamilyliteracy.com.

 

 

Posted by Shannon Parker  on June 28, 2011

Adult Ed Diploma Program Offers a Way Forward [RSU #13 Adult and Community Education]

as published in the Bangor Daily News (Midcoast Beacon) http://bangordailynews.com/2011/06/20/news/adult-ed-diploma-program-offers-a-way-forward/

Adult ed diploma program offers a way forward

By Heather Steeves, BDN Staff

June 20, 2011, Posted 4:46 p.m. at
ROCKLAND, Maine —  Everyone sitting in the GED and adult high school diploma programs in Rockland has a different story — a different reason for leaving high school early and a different reason for coming back.

Some of them now have children of their own and couldn’t help them with their homework. Some found the perfect job, but weren’t qualified because they didn’t finish high school.

“Even McDonald’s and Burger King ask for a GED or high school diploma,” said GED preparatory teacher Beth Gifford.

Earlier this month Regional School Unit 13 graduated 25 adult students who all earned either their GED or high school diploma. Some of those students have already been accepted to college or have gotten jobs.

The program is completely free and volunteer-run.

For people who left high school with only a few credits to go, the adult ed program allows them to take their remaining high school classes at night at Rockland District High School. These  courses take three hours per week for 15 weeks. For people who didn’t get as far in high school, the adult ed program helps them get their GED.

Students are assessed by trained volunteers in the learning center at the McLain School on Lincoln Street. There are five areas of study, including math, English and social studies. To get a GED, a person must pass a test in each subject area. People who are already knowledgeable in some areas can take those tests and study for the others. According to Gifford, the adult students don’t have to do it all at once. If he or she wanted to, a student could study for one test at a time. Because of this, the time it takes each person to earn a GED varies.

“It’s an open-ended thing. It depends where their skills are now. If you went through April your senior year of high school, it won’t take you more than a few weeks,” Gifford said. “The ones who went through eighth grade, started their freshman year and didn’t make it and are 45 and haven’t done anything since — those people should plan to be here a while.”

From the beginning of the GED and high school diploma courses, volunteers try to get the students into a bigger-picture mindset. This, Gifford said, is why so many of this year’s graduates already have offers from colleges and employers.

“We get them in that mindset before they start,” she said. “As we work on the GED we also work on what career they are looking at and what training it will take them to get there. We ask, what do you want to do? Do you want to be a nurse? A commercial driver? Do you want to be a physicist? In their minds they often have things in their head they didn’t think were possible. We try to show them they are possible.”

The learning center is open 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. People interested in getting their GED or high school diploma should walk in or call 594-5154.

Anyone who would like to volunteer to tutor GED students also may call 594-5154.

RSU 13’s adult ed program also offers Coast Guard Captain’s License, Computers for the Very Beginner, Mixed Media Painting and Office Skills courses. Most are free or cost about $25. For more information, visit http://rsu13.maineadulted.org.




 

Posted by Shannon Parker  on June 28, 2011

PVAEC holds Graduation Ceremony June 15, 2011 [PVAEC - Piscataquis Valley Adult Education Cooperative]

Graduation Podium

PVAEC held its graduation ceremony on Wednesday, June 15, 2011 at the Center Theatre in Dover-Foxcroft.  A full house came to support and celebrate our graduates' accomplishments.  It was a beautiful day and a beautiful ceremony.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our keynote speaker was Ray Therrien from Mt Blue Adult & Community Education in Franklin County.  Ray spoke of the new opportunities awaiting each graduate and reminded us to accept new challenges that help us grow and reach our potential.

 

Ray Therrien at podium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduates are ready to turn their tassels as the symbolic act that this phase of their education is complete and they are ready for what' next - employment, college or post-secondary training.

Graduates

 

Congratulations to all!  For more information, contact PVAEC at 564-6525.

 

Posted by Kathy Normandin  on June 27, 2011 | Read more in: News and Events

MACEA Officer Meeting 06.17.11 [Maine Adult Correctional Education Association]

MACEA_officer_meeting_6.17.11.doc

 

Posted by Richard Lumb  on June 23, 2011 | Read more in: News

SPICE FAMILY LITERACY PROGRAM AWARDED GRANT FROM THE BARBARA BUSH FOUNDATION’S MAINE FAMILY LITERACY [RSU #3]

(Biddeford, ME)  – Mrs. Barbara Bush announced today that the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy’s Maine Family Literacy Initiative (MEFLI) (www.mainefamilyliteracy.com) has awarded $25,000 Lighthouse Model Program Grant to the SPICE Family Literacy Program.

 

Pat Hughes proudly accepted the award from Mrs. Bush at a ceremony held at the

 J. Richard Martin Community Center in Biddeford, on June 15, 2011.  The grant will be used in the RSU #3 Students and Parents in Cooperative Education (SPICE) Family Literacy Program to continue offering education services to a large rural region. The Program has always been a home-based program serving most in need families in a 440 square mile, 11 town district in western Waldo County. The program sends adult education and early childhood instructors into the homes using laptops, computer-assisted curricula and Internet to alleviate the barriers of child care and transportation. In 2005, the SPICE Program was recognized as an Effective Program and listed on the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Lifelong Learning database.  In 2010, the SPICE program created a virtual school with assistance from a NASA engineer and with help from England and Mexico.  Today that virtual school is helping families reach their educational goals and overcoming the issues of rural isolation.

 

“The abilities to read, write and comprehend enable people to create brighter and more prosperous futures for themselves, their families and their communities,” said Mrs. Bush.  “The staff and volunteers with the MEFLI programs are making a wonderful difference in many lives, and I am proud of their work to make Maine a more literate state.”

A total of ten grants of $25, 000 were awarded this year from applications submitted by libraries, adult education and public schools across the state. Programs receiving support provide family literacy services including adult and early childhood instruction, and time for parents and children to read together.  An additional two planning grants of $5,000 each will help communities develop the partnerships and resources needed to implement a family literacy program in 2011. 

Former first lady Barbara Bush, right, and Maine's first lady Anne LePage listen to remarks at ceremony for Literacy Maine, Wednesday, June 15, 2011, in Biddeford, Maine. The Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy awarded grants to provide quality family literacy programming. As of June 2011, the Foundation has awarded over $40 million to 902 family literacy programs. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

 

Posted by Tammie Leach  on June 15, 2011